Wet posters - Russian impressionism museum

Wet posters, 1973

Yuri Pimenov

Oil on canvas
80.7X86.7

This is not a painting - but a shot from an old film, a classic. Yuri Pimenov often built the composition of his works using the conventions of film-making. He cuts out all that is unnecessary, and leaves only subtle details—the turn of a head, a fleeting smile—which create the image. Pimenov wasn’t concerned with action as much as the emotional background of moments snatched from life. If we walk past the canvas, we become one of the passers-by. We feel like opening an umbrella and running through the old streets of Moscow to escape from the rain. How cleverly the artist creates the "frame": yellow, orange, blue and black patches run into each other, and the long and short silver threads of rain penetrate and pierce the canvas. "I love the rain, I love the freshness that comes with it. I love wet umbrellas and their rhythmic movement on the streets. Love is a state of nature. Drops of love which sit, delicate and fragile, on these branches. That's what I really like. Rain always attracted me, and I tried to convey the sensation of it in art," Pimenov said. After passing through an infatuation with Valentin Serov and Eduard Manet, Pimenov reached his own type of impressionism. His vision would never fit into any formal framework, and was not confined to technique, the play of colour or brushstrokes. Pimenov considered that he adhered to "realistic impressionism", and that only he, the artist thought, was able to reflect the real life of the 20th century, with all its huge changes.