Nikitsky Gate. 1948 - Russian impressionism museum

Nikitsky Gate. 1948

Yakov Khaimov

Oil on canvas
57.9X46.4

Yakov Khaimov’s paintings are studies of old Moscow. He lived there his whole life and enthusiastically painted "portraits" of his favourite streets, avenues, and squares. As a talented colourist, a master of plein air landscapes, and an impressionist, he sought to convey the aura of the city, its light and atmosphere. Khaimov painted this landscape directly on the square of the Nikitsky Gate, with a view of the monument to Timiryazev. Khaimov tried to reflect not only on nature, but also to convey the special historical atmosphere of this place in 1948. The monument had stood here for a quarter of a century, but during the war it had been knocked from its pedestal by the blast of a bomb. Traces of the bombing remained on the statue and can still be seen today. But this old Moscow cannot be seen any longer, however - it is unique to Khaimov’s paintings. The artist painted this “urban portrait” like a free sketch. Don’t look for any detailed study, but pay attention to the bright range of colours. Occasional rich smears of paint on the clothes of the passers-by create the dynamics of Moscow life of the late '40s, and set the rhythm of this city landscape.